Encore: Lobero Behind the Scenes

August’s construction gallery offers a once-in-a-lifetime view

Preservation work in August included one of the most interesting new views–up close and personal with the Lobero’s ceiling. Check out pics from on top of the 30 ft scaffolding built during this video. The ceiling’s textures are much bigger than I had anticipated, and very much in need of some touchup paint. In addition, there’s extensive ducting work above, so not only is the crew hiking 30 ft up to the ceiling, they prop smaller ladders up, and climb even higher.

Another detail to point out is a close-up of a Shakespearean drama mask; did you know those guys–both Comedy and Tragedy–are carved into the top of each pillar in the Lobero’s auditorium? They’ve been up there this whole time. A part of Encore: Lobeoro is refurbishing and highlighting clever architectural details like these. Be sure to look closely for unique touches like that once we reopen in December.

I give you, August at the Lobero’s once-in-a-lifetime viewpoint in this month’s gallery, below (… from above … you know what I mean.)

Take a piece of the Lobero home with you.

Professional musical equipment, theatrical items, auditorium seats and more are available for purchase until November 15.

Encore: Lobero preservation work is well underway, leading us to rediscover many treasures hidden in storage, which, means one thing – from now through mid-November, we’re having a garage sale.

Lobero SeatsMany items from the Lobero’s warehouse full of equipment and theatrical goods are up for sale, including a pre-1920’s steamer trunk, tour-worthy road cases, amplifiers, lighting & accessories and a handful of seats recently removed from the Lobero auditorium at prices that are ready to move. The seats come in doubles or triples, and need to find a new home by the end of November 2013 — hopefully yours!

Check out LovetheLobero.com/garage-sale for the full list of items up for sale.

PS, A purchase made through the Lobero garage sale is not considered a donation to the Encore: Lobero campaign. Those wishing to make a contribution may do so at LovetheLobero.com.

 

The Big Chill

Meet, the big crane

The Lobero is getting air conditioning for the first time in its existence. This air conditioning system is the thoughtful combination of modern engineering and historical elegance.

To wit: The Lobero Theatre was built in 1922 with no internal ducting structure whatsoever. In order to incorporate the comfort of a heating and air conditioning system into the auditorium, engineers and designers had to go deeper. In order to retain the Lobero’s historical integrity, it’s key that modernizations like this are not seen or heard. So, we called in the big guns. Experts including acousticians, HVAC professionals, architectural designers and historians were consulted to make sure the new system was integrated seamlessly, just the way George W. Smith & Lutah Maria Riggs would have liked.

As you can see, the solution was to house the big chiller on the roof of the Lobero and adjacent scene shop and add miles of ducting, much of which is underground, to reduce noise.

On August 6 a huge crane arrived at the Lobero to lift components for the new air conditioning system up onto the roof. Check out this 1 minute video snapshot of another milestone event in the Lobero Preservation Project. Video by David Bazemore.

Into the Vault

Welcome to the Lobero LIVE video archives

To borrow a phrase from our dear friend Hale Milgrim, we’re inviting you into “the vault.” Which, in this case, is the collection of Lobero LIVE videos we’ve recently uploaded to the Lobero YouTube channel. We’ve been lucky enough to chat with a few artists as they’ve performed at the Lobero, and saved those videos.

The Capitol Steps made up an original Lobero rhyme in the style of “Lirty Dies,” during one visit. There’s clips of some of the great ladies of jazz, including Shirley Horn, Tierney Sutton, and Dianne Reeves as they sing their love for the Lobero, both on- and off-stage.

Check out Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan‘s impromptu jam in the greenroom, and David Lindley strummin’ away in his dressing room. We hope you enjoy the backstage banter with all these great talents. After you’ve watched, feel free to subscribe in case we’re able to get back to adding to our collection.

Below is a clip from the late Richie Havens who said it better than anyone else, back in 2007:

We love you too Richie. Thanks for the memories.

Rise of the Scaffolding

Looking up, up, up at the Spanish Revival ceiling

The next order of business in the auditorium is to refresh the Lobero’s beautiful mosaic ceiling. 89 years of dust, grime and cigarette smoke (remember when it was acceptable to smoke in public places?) have left their mark. It’s time to show that ceiling some love.

Watch the enormous  scaffolding structure build up to 30 ft. tall over the course of five days, bringing the pros eye-to-eye with this gorgeous piece of history.

Thanks again to David Bazemore for his video skills.

Viva la Fiesta!

Lobero Staff in Parade

Lobero Theatre board and staff ride in the 2012 Fiesta Parade

It all began in 1924…

Tracing the history of the Lobero Theatre’s reopening and Old Spanish Days Fiesta

The grand opening of Santa Barbaraʼs rebuilt Lobero Theatre took place on August 4, 1924, with the play Beggar on Horseback. Nine days later, on August 13, 1924 another horse-related event took place just around the corner on State Street, soon to be known as the first official Fiesta parade. Given that these two celebrations occurred so close together, was there a connection?

Lobero Theatre Board member George Burtness worked with prominent local historians to find the answers. Read the full story here, excerpted from BACKSTAGE at the Lobero.

Keep an eye out for the team in tomorrow’s parade as well —

Fiesta is a holiday that began as a small-town family party to mark the resurrection of a cherished institution­–a theatre.” – Otis Wickenhauser, Captured Dream, A History of the Lobero Theatre

Encore Lobero Behind the Scenes

See July’s gallery of Behind-the Scenes construction photos

Encore Lobero is entering its second month of preservation work, which means we’re almost one-third of the way through!

The new restrooms are taking shape with framing in place, and plumbing and electrical coming up soon. New concrete has been poured and other sub-floor work in the auditorium is now done, which means immense scaffolding structures are being built to allow painters to reach and refresh the mosaic ceiling. The ceiling renewal work may be one of my personal favorite touches of the Encore: Lobero scope — I can’t wait to see that iconic ceiling restored to its original jewel-tone glory.

Thanks to David Bazemore for the shots below —

Summer Vacation

Tessitura Learning & Community Conference
San Francisco, July 14-18

The LTF recently sent five staff members up  to the San Fran for five days of software knowledge and professional training as part of the Tessitura Network (#TLCC13). We had a blast meeting and mingling with theatre personnel from all over the world and our own backyard, joining our colleagues at the Granada Theatre and Arts & Lectures. Now we’re all armed with new tricks and tips from the world of ticketing and fundraising.

Beyond conference walls, team Lobero cruised daily through Union Square, noshed at the San Francisco Ferry building marketplace, enjoyed an evening reception with a gorgeous view of the Bay Bridge, and represented at the conference-closing bash at the California Academy of Sciences (which is a stunner of a museum).

As I once wrote in my Junior High yearbook, Stay cool, Don’t ever change. Have a great summer!!!

Encore: Lobero Behind the Scenes

Go behind-the-walls with these behind-the-scenes photos

The Lobero Theatre has been dark for one whole month now, and the Schipper Construction crew has been hard at work with demolition. Seats have been removed, the bricks outside the building have been carefully removed and stored for later use, and interior walls are coming down for the (hooray) expanded restrooms.

Ever wondered how much space 680 seat cushions use when stacked? Turns out, they’ll fill an entire U-Haul truck. Check out peeks of original 1924 brick-work and other treasures hiding behind the drywall in these behind-the-scenes photos from June, shot by David Bazemore.